Alejandro Narvaez-Contreras - Court action

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Date
10 March 2011
Category
Court actions

An unregistered builder has been convicted and ordered to pay more than $6000 in fines and compensation, after taking thousands from homeowners for new timber floors that were never laid.

Consumer Affairs Victoria took court action against 32-year-old Alejandro Narvaez-Contreras, of St Albans, after complaints from customers.

The customers had paid Mr Narvaez-Contreras more than $11,000 to install new timber flooring, but the works were never completed.

In one case, a customer contacted Mr Narvaez-Contreras after seeing an advertisement in the local paper. He visited their Bellfield house and provided a quote for $5400. The customers agreed to the quote and paid a deposit of $2600 directly to Mr Narvaez-Contreras. 

In another case, a Caroline Springs couple engaged Mr Narvaez-Contreras’ services to construct new timber flooring. They agreed to a quote for $14,500 and paid him a deposit of $8500.

In both cases, Mr Narvaez-Contreras breached the Domestic Building Contracts Act 1995 by demanding deposits of more than 10 per cent of the total purchase price.

Mr Narvaez-Contreras pleaded guilty in the Melbourne Magistrates Court on 4 February 2011 to five charges after advertising as a builder despite not having a licence, taking excessive deposits and accepting payment for work he failed to complete.

The court ordered Mr Narvaez-Contreras to pay $3500 in fines, $2600 compensation to two victims and $1468 in legal costs to Consumer Affairs Victoria.

10 March 2011

An unregistered builder has been convicted and ordered to pay more than $6000 in fines and compensation, after taking thousands from homeowners for new timber floors that were never laid.

Consumer Affairs Victoria took court action against 32-year-old Alejandro Narvaez-Contreras, of St Albans, after complaints from customers.

The customers had paid Mr Narvaez-Contreras more than $11,000 to install new timber flooring, but the works were never completed.

In one case, a customer contacted Mr Narvaez-Contreras after seeing an advertisement in the local paper. He visited their Bellfield house and provided a quote for $5400. The customers agreed to the quote and paid a deposit of $2600 directly to Mr Narvaez-Contreras. 

In another case, a Caroline Springs couple engaged Mr Narvaez-Contreras’ services to construct new timber flooring. They agreed to a quote for $14,500 and paid him a deposit of $8500.

In both cases, Mr Narvaez-Contreras breached the Domestic Building Contracts Act 1995 by demanding deposits of more than 10 per cent of the total purchase price.

Mr Narvaez-Contreras pleaded guilty in the Melbourne Magistrates Court on 4 February 2011 to five charges after advertising as a builder despite not having a licence, taking excessive deposits and accepting payment for work he failed to complete.

The court ordered Mr Narvaez-Contreras to pay $3500 in fines, $2600 compensation to two victims and $1468 in legal costs to Consumer Affairs Victoria.

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