Report a scam

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How to report a scam

If you would like to tell us about a scam you have:

  • been targeted by
  • fallen for
  • information about

Report a scam

Note: This form has three stages and you have 20 minutes to complete each stage. Each stage will automatically refresh after 20 minutes and clear all data.

You can also report a scam by calling our Helpline on 1300 55 81 81, 9:00 am to 5:00 pm, Monday to Friday (except public holidays). Note: Calling our Helpline costs the same as a local call. Additional charges may apply from mobile or payphones. 

Please provide as much detail as possible to help us with any investigations, including a daytime contact number as we may need to call you for more information.

Money transfers

If you believe you have sent money to a scammer through a money transfer agent, such as Western Union or MoneyGram, contact those agencies immediately. If you transferred money via your credit card, contact your bank or financial institution immediately.

For more information, view our Scams section.

Why should I make a report?

Although we cannot actively respond to or investigate every report we receive, all intelligence is helpful to us.

We frequently use the information we receive about scams to warn other Victorians, and rely on the public to tell us about any issues within our jurisdiction that may cause widespread harm to consumers.

We often share information we receive about scams with state and federal regulators, so that we can better protect Australians from scams.

How to report travelling con men

If you know of travelling con men in your area, please report them by calling the National Travelling Con Men Hotline on 1300 133 408.

Travelling con men are dodgy tradesmen who knock on doors of homes and small businesses, offering to do maintenance work. For more information, including how to identify and avoid them, view our Travelling con men page.

Why should I make a report?

Reporting travelling con men - and particularly the locations where they are active - helps us warn other people about their activities.

We post alerts on our Facebook and Twitter pages about where travelling con men have been sighted, so that you can warn friends or family in those areas.

Travelling con men move on from an area quickly and usually only give a first name and mobile number, so tracing them can be difficult. That is why warning people quickly is often the best way to prevent consumer harm by ensuring Victorians can identify and avoid them.

Although we cannot actively respond to or investigate every report we receive, all intelligence is helpful to us.

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